Introduction

  • Diesel fuel is a liquid fuel that is made from the byproduct of petroleum. Diesel fuel was originally supposed to be coal dust, but in 1895, Rudolf Diesel discovered the use of petroleum byproducts for liquid fuel in diesel engines. A commonly known example of diesel engines would be: school buses, construction machines, and public buses. It is also used in trucks, trains, boats, military vehicles, and even generators. The military likes using diesel because it is less flammable and is less prone to stalling, unlike gasoline engines. Diesels are also more capable of producing higher torque numbers than gasoline engines.

  • I chose to study the chemistry of diesel fuel because diesel has a big impact on America. Almost every construction, military, and key transportation vehicles are powered by diesel fuel, in fact about 94% of freight relies on diesel. They are more fuel efficient and have unbeatable reliability. I also have a strong interest in diesels as well.

  • Diesel fuel is something that is actually involved in my life everyday. Because it is something that I have a deep interest in, and I also personally own a diesel, so I am driving a vehicle powered by diesel fuel everyday. I also love doing research and learning more about diesel and being able to work on my truck.

  • Composition of …

    • Crude Oil

      • Hydrocarbons(hydrogen and oxygen)

        • Paraffins (roughly 75%)

          • Carbon atoms that link, forming chain like molecules.

            • N-paraffins

            • Isoparaffins

            • Ranging from C10H22 to C20H42

        • Aromatics (roughly 25%)

          • Similar to Naphthenes, a ring like structure is created, but they are joined by aromatic (double) bonds, instead of single bonds.

          • C10H8 – C20H34

    • Sulfur

    • Nitrogen